Welcome to the Secure Your Browser Page

 

Secure Your Browser

The Risk

Ways to prevent yourself from browser risk.

  • Set browser security to high.
  • Always use and update browser.
  • Add safe web sites to trusted sites.
  • Read emails in plain text.
  • Turn on pop blocker.
  • Disable the login and remember password information.
  • Enable Phishing liter.
  • Set proper action for downloads.
  • Warn user when websites try to install extensions.
  • Check visited sites for suspected forgery.
  • Make sure any site with a password or personal information uses HTTPS or has the secure lock next to the url.

Browser risk

  • Phishing- convincing a user to enter in personal information.
  • Spyware-  computer software that allows intercept or take partial control over a user’s PC.
  • Cookies- session cookies are cleared when the browser is closed, and persistent cookies will remain on the computer until the specified expiration date is reached. Cookies can be used to uniquely identify visitors of a web site, which some people consider a violation of privacy. If a web site uses cookies for authentication, then an attacker may be able to acquire unauthorized access to that site by obtaining the cookie. Persistent cookies pose a higher risk than session cookies because they remain on the computer longer.
  • Pop-ups- generally show advertisements but can contain scams or spyware.

Why and How to Secure

Why Secure Your Browser

Today, web browsers such as Microsoft Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, and Apple Safari are installed on almost all computers. Because web browsers are used so frequently, it is vital to configure them securely. Often, the web browser that comes with an operating system is not set up in a secure default configuration. Not securing your web browser can lead quickly to a variety of computer problems caused by anything from spyware being installed without your knowledge to intruders taking control of your computer.

Web Browser Features and Risks

It is important to understand the functionality and features of the web browser you use. Enabling some web browser features may lower security. Vendors often enable features by default to improve the computing experience, but these features may end up increasing the risk to the computer.

Attackers focus on exploiting client-side systems (your computer) through various vulnerabilities. They use these vulnerabilities to take control of your computer, steal your information, destroy your files, and use your computer to attack other computers. A low-cost method attackers use is to exploit vulnerabilities in web browsers. An attacker can create a malicious web page that will install Trojan software or spyware that will steal your information. Rather than actively targeting and attacking vulnerable systems, a malicious website can passively compromise systems as the site is visited. A malicious HTML document can also be emailed to victims. In these cases, the act of opening the email or attachment can compromise the system.

Some specific web browser features and associated risks are briefly described below. Understanding what different features do will help you understand how they affect your web browser's functionality and the security of your computer.

ActiveX is a technology used by Microsoft Internet Explorer on Microsoft Windows systems. ActiveX allows applications or parts of applications to be utilized by the web browser. A web page can use ActiveX components that may already reside on a Windows system, or a site may provide the component as a downloadable object. This gives extra functionality to traditional web browsing, but may also introduce more severe vulnerabilities if not properly implemented.

ActiveX has been plagued with various vulnerabilities and implementation issues. One problem with using ActiveX in a web browser is that it greatly increases the attack surface, or “attackability,” of a system. Installing any Windows application introduces the possibility of new ActiveX controls being installed. Vulnerabilities in ActiveX objects may be exploited via Internet Explorer, even if the object was never designed to be used in a web browser. In 2000, the CERT/CC held a workshop to analyze security in ActiveX. Many vulnerabilities with respect to ActiveX controls lead to severe impacts. Often an attacker can take control of the computer.

Java is an object-oriented programming language that can be used to develop active content for websites. A Java Virtual Machine, or JVM, is used to execute the Java code, or “applet" (link is external),” provided by the website. Some operating systems come with a JVM, while others require a JVM to be installed before Java can be used. Java applets are operating system independent.

Java applets usually execute within a “sandbox” where the interaction with the rest of the system is limited. However, various implementations of the JVM contain vulnerabilities that allow an applet to bypass these restrictions. Signed Java applets can also bypass sandbox restrictions, but they generally prompt the user before they can execute.

Plug-ins are applications intended for use in the web browser. Netscape has developed the NPAPI standard for developing plug-ins, but this standard is used by multiple web browsers, including Mozilla Firefox and Safari. Plug-ins are similar to ActiveX controls but cannot be executed outside of a web browser. Adobe Flash is an example of an application that is available as a plug-in.

Plug-ins can contain programming flaws such as buffer overflows, or they may contain design flaws such as cross-domain violations, which arises when the same origin policy is not followed.

Cookies are files placed on your system to store data for specific websites. A cookie can contain any information that a website is designed to place in it. Cookies may contain information about the sites you visited, or may even contain credentials for accessing the site. Cookies are designed to be readable only by the website that created the cookie. Session cookies are cleared when the browser is closed, and persistent cookies will remain on the computer until the specified expiration date is reached.

Cookies can be used to uniquely identify visitors of a website, which some people consider a violation of privacy. If a website uses cookies for authentication, then an attacker may be able to acquire unauthorized access to that site by obtaining the cookie. Persistent cookies pose a higher risk than session cookies because they remain on the computer longer.

JavaScript, also known as ECMAScript, is a scripting language that is used to make websites more interactive. There are specifications in the JavaScript standard that restrict certain features such as accessing local files.

VBScript is another scripting language that is unique to Microsoft Windows Internet Explorer. VBScript is similar to JavaScript, but it is not as widely used in websites because of limited compatibility with other browsers.

The ability to run a scripting language such as JavaScript or VBScript allows web page authors to add a significant amount of features and interactivity to a web page. However, this same capability can be abused by attackers. The default configuration for most web browsers enables scripting support, which can introduce multiple vulnerabilities, such as the following:

  • Cross-Site Scripting

    Cross-Site Scripting, often referred to as XSS, is a vulnerability in a website that permits an attacker to leverage the trust relationship that you have with that site. Note that Cross-Site Scripting is not usually caused by a failure in the web browser.

  • Cross-Zone and Cross-Domain Vulnerabilities

    Most web browsers employ security models to prevent script in a website from accessing data in a different domain. Internet Explorer also has a policy to enforce security zone separation.

    Vulnerabilities that violate these security models can be used to perform actions that a site could not normally perform. The impact can be similar to a cross-site scripting vulnerability. However, if a vulnerability allows for an attacker to cross into the local machine zone or other protected areas, the attacker may be able to execute arbitrary commands on the vulnerable system.

  • Detection Evasion

    Anti-virus, Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS), and Intrusion Prevention Systems (IPS) generally work by looking for specific patterns in content. If a “known bad” pattern is detected, then the appropriate actions can take place to protect the user. However, because of the dynamic nature of programming languages, scripting in web pages can be used to evade such protective systems.